Push Your Limits


While in Dubai, we had an excellent discussion after the Sakki test. The new Dubai Shidōshi was telling me that when I came him for the test, he thought his heart was going to explode. He was scared to death.

But we all know, the only risk is a bump in the top of the head. There’s no need to be afraid. Tense, yes. But far, no.

We are afraid when don’t know. Training, the Sakki test, is only a question of knowing. The more we learn, and the more we know. The more we know, and the more we push our self-imposed limits.

Life is about pushing these limits. When you are afraid of something, the best attitude (Kamae) is to face it, to see what is the origin of your fear.

Many people have fears they never confronted. To me, this is not the path of a right Bujinkan practitioner. Learning the Bujinkan way is to accept those challenges and situations.

All my life I have faced my fears: heights, depths, speaking to large groups, etc. That is why I did skydiving, mountain climbing, Scuba diving, and great seminars.

Every time I found out that there were no logical reasons for my fears. Our fears exist before the experience. They are simply a mental construction that has no real foundation. They come from our reluctance to changes.

After so many years in the Bujinkan, I can say that one of the most interesting aspects of sensei’s teachings is to develop this ability to survive and to push our limits.

Instead of being afraid of the unknown, face it and tame it. It’s easier than you think.

When I called Hatsumi sensei right after the Fukushima catastrophe and asked him if he was planning to leave, his answer was “Banpen Fugyō”. To me, this is the answer to any fear: Ten thousand changes, no surprise!

Do not accept your limits, free yourself from fear itself recognise it for what it is: an illusion.

Do you want to be happy? Push your limits, because if you don’t, they will become your real limits.

Ps: congratulations to the first shidōshi made in UAE.
Paris Taikai 2017 registration

One Comment Add yours

  1. It was a strange experience. Even now two months later, I am not quite sure how I passed. I can relate to the new Dubai shidoshi (congratulations). To me it was not as if my heart was going to explode, but it was as if I was dragged into a hole and after passing it was like I finally could breathe again. I agree to you, that one has to push ones limits and like in “real life” you never know, when this moment comes, when fear is keeping you away from the next step.

    Like

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